The best tool every vegan should use to talk about veganism

iron veganism cartoon
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

How to respond to the ignorant and hurtful comments on your “non-filling”, “deficient”, “flavour-less” vegan meals is probably one of the most annoying things that every vegan has to prepare for at some point.

 

Have you ever wondered why it is still so hard for vegans to eat in peace, despite all the documentaries, research, slaughterhouse videos, celebrities, news articles all talking about veganism loud and clear?

 

It is still generally considered that vegans have to give up many enjoyable things in life to love animals, locked away from all the yummy foods. Why?

 

Miki Mottes, a vegan illustrator who made Simple Happy Kitchen, raised a good point. Maybe all the public is seeing is the disturbing despite truthful images of slaughterhouses, but not so much of the enjoyable, and nutritious food we have.

 

If you think about it: how did the meat, tobacco or milk industry lure us into buying their products? – Relaxing, sweet and fun campaigns. The milk ads often involve adorable babies, the cigarettes ads often elicit a relaxing feeling and the meat campaigns do it the best – they zoom right into the splashing juice when grilling a steak. Aren’t these just irresistible?

 

If there is a more gentle, fun, and easy way to tell your friends, or the haters, about veganism, how will you feel?

 

I would be so relieved. I don’t have to waste my time showing the truth for the 1000th time to that colleague who just never wants to take my words! I don’t have to go find some corner and eat my lunch alone just to avoid communication on this topic!

 

Miki understood that for more people to understand our lifestyle, and that we don’t suffer from just eating plant foods, we have to show them veganism is fun, simple, and nutritious.

 

SO..She turned

…into

She turned this boring bar graph

into…

Her illustrations are simple, uplifting, evidence-based, and easy for anyone (even the stonehearted) to take in, bits by bit.

 

And guess what? If you are struggling to explain vegan nutrition to a friend, your little one, or simply anyone, Miki has cool illustrations like this one:

 

Now. Do you think people will feel we are suffering from this vegan diet? Do you think people will say we are just imposing our beliefs onto them?

 

For the health of humans, animals and the planet, we need to keep doing the good work we are doing telling the truth, living the life, but also showing how enjoyable this lifestyle can be!

 

We need to be intelligent at the approach we use to spread the love, and Miki has offered us great tools!

 

You can freely download Miki’s Protein, Calcium and Iron printable posters here, even in different languages!

 

We should thank all the vegans out there for doing the great work protecting the animals, the planet and human health. If you would like to support Miki’s gentle approach, check out her book How to go vegan – the simple happy kitchen.

 

I hope you all find this tool helpful, and keep spreading the love!

 

*All images in this blog belong to Miki Mottes and can be found on her website – Simple Happy Kitchen

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube

Combating diabetes: latest research and approaches

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

 

What is the most important factor when it comes to diabetes genetics, sugar, calories, insulin

 

A few years ago, we may say sugar and insulin, but new research has dramatically changed what we know about diabetes.

 

“Fat, get out of the way and let me pump my sugar!” – Insulin.

 

It turns out that the fat in animal products and oils prevent insulin from doing its critical job – moving glucose into cells, lowering blood sugar level, and keeping us healthy.

 

In other words, what caused your diabetes or made it worse is not just your refined white bread or sugary drinks, but also the mayo dressing or cheese slices that you eat all the time!

 

Experiments on mice have shown that when fat is reduced from the diet, insulin can function properly, alleviating and eventually curing Type II diabetes!

 

Therefore, a low-fat, plant-based diet is the best for diabetes and conditions associated with it, such as heart disease, obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

Has this been shown in humans?

 

Yes. One study found that 21 of 23 patients on oral medications and 13 of 17 patients on insulin did not need their medications after 26 days on a near-vegetarian diet and exercise program.

These dietary changes are simple, but the effects they had are profound, both on a short-term and long-term scale. However, Dr. Neal Barnard from Physicians Committee of Responsible medicine points out that “choosing skinless chicken, skim milk, and baked fish is not enough of a change for most people to beat diabetes”. A plant-based diet is necessary if you are serious about diabetes.

How to combat diabetes with a dietary approach?

Go plant-based and throw out animal products.

Make your meals with whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Drink water. Keep nuts
or seeds to a small handful every day. The amount that you sprinkle on your breakfast oatmeal is sufficient. Avoid animal products of all sorts to avoid saturated fats. You can easily get your protein and fat intake with balanced plant-based meals so don’t worry. Plus, there are plenty of resources on our page that can help you, such as this food plate from Vegan Palette.
vegan Food Plate

Avoid vegetable oil too.

Although vegetable oils are healthier compared to animal fats, they should still be avoided. All fats and oils are high in calories – 1g of any fat or oil has 9 calories, whereas 1g of carbohydrate has only 4 calories. We only need a small amount each day and it is so easy to go overboard in the modern days. Remember to watch out for oily sauces and dressings. Also, don’t assume you can eat as many avocados and nuts as you want! Check out this video by an accredited dietitian, nutritionist Raymond from Vegan Palette :”Why eating plant-based means giving up oil“.

Read food labels! 

Don’t be fooled by the packaging. Food industries can print “Low-calories”, “Low fat” in big block letters and fool you into thinking they are healthy. Always check the back and choose foods with no more than 2-3g of fat per serving if you are serious about not getting diabetes.

Avoid high GI foods.

The glycemic index (GI) identifies foods that tend to raise blood sugar. These include white rice, white and wheat bread, corn flakes, puffed rice cereals, and most commercial cereals. Swap them with low GI foods, such as oats, sweet potations, natural pasta, beans and so on. Instead of rice, you can eat quinoa. Instead of white bread, you can eat rye bread, multigrain brain, and sourdough.

Lots and lots of fibre

Fibre is literally the best thing about plant-based diets. They are the natural cleaners for your blood vessels and digestive system. If you follow the above advice and eat plenty of plant foods, you will easily get at least 40g of fibre per day. You should aim for at least 40g of fibre each day. When reading food labels, check if there is at least 3g of fiber per serving.

To learn more about diabetes and get started fixing it with a plant-based dietary approach, we recommend these resources:

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube

Why can’t food scientists agree on coconut oil? Does it really burn fat?

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

What’s the fuss?

Coconut oil is probably one of the most controversial food. Some regard it is a “superfood“, rich in antioxidant and other nutrients. Claims regarding what it can do ranges from burning fat, preventing Alzheimer’s disease and improving endurance. But surprisingly, others consider it as a “devilfood“. Karin Micheals, a professor at Harvard, even went as far as calling coconut oil a “pure poison“.

 

What’s the truth?

Why can’t food scientists agree on coconut oil? Are the claimed benefits backed up by research or made up simply for propaganda?

 

Well, interestingly this debate on the coconut oil is actually related to changes in our nutrition guidelines and beliefs.

 

In the past, fats were considered bad and people consumed mostly carbohydrates in their diets. Of course, in the modern days, carbs often translate into highly processed, bad carbs, not complex natural carbs. As a result, obesity and diabetes skyrocketed, leading to new advice in the opposite direction “Avoid carbs and eat more fats!”

 

The pro-fat voice soon pushed avocados, olive oil and chia seeds into the spotlight. The public quickly learned about these new foods and called them “superfood“. While most food scientists and nutritionists agree that the fats in avocados and olive oil are healthy, compared to other fat sources, they couldn’t quite agree on coconut oil, a food composed almost entirely of saturated fat!

 

For decades, the heart associations educate people that saturated fat is bad as it increases cholesterol levels, putting people at risk for terrible heart diseases.

 

But coconut oil comes from plants, surely it is healthy?

 

Of course, coconut oil is not pro-inflammatory like meat. But compared to other vegetable oil that is lower in saturated fat, coconut oil does increase LDL cholesterol (the “bad” cholesterol” levels, make it less healthy. Therefore, it is all relative – coconut oil can be considered healthy or unhealthy, depending on what you are comparing it to.

 

If you have been puzzled by coconut oil, don’t subscribe to either extreme – It is not a “superfood“, but it is also not a “devilfood“. There are both better and worse sources that can offer you the needed fat.

 

Does coconut oil really burn fat?

The fat-burning claim about coconut oil came from some evidence that suggested the medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) in coconut oil can promote fat loss. While it is true that coconut oil contains a lot of MCT, follow-up research has shown no difference in the fat-burning ability of coconut oil compared to other types of oil.

 

In fact, there are only 4 calories in 1 gram of protein and carbohydrate, but there are 9 calories in 1 gram of fat! Correct – more than double. This applies to all oil types, including coconut oil! So by consuming lots of coconut oil, you can easily add 200-400 extra calories and that of course, will reflect on your waistline. To sum up, coconut oil doesn’t burn fat, instead, it could make you gain weight. You should avoid over-consumption of all types of oils, even if it’s vegetable oil!

 

Conclusion

For those of you already on a vegan, plant-based diet, coconut oil is probably in your kitchen a lot. Don’t throw it out, as it is surely much better than butter and improves the flavor of many dishes. However, also don’t over-use this one type of oil. In fact, be cautious of any claim of “superfood” as it is like just propaganda. The best way to eat healthily is always to have variety like we always advocate for at Vegan Palette. In this case of oil, have other monounsaturated and polyunsaturated oils in your kitchens, such as olive oil, sunflower oil, and canola oil.

 

To learn more about coconut oil and vegetable oils, I recommend Dr. Michael Greger:

Coconut oil

Is coconut oil good for you?

Does coconut oil cure Alzheimer’s?

Does coconut oil clog arteries?

What about coconuts, coconut milk & coconut oil MCTs?

 

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26946252

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326600

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

 

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube

Disease-fighting phytonutrients – power of real plant foods

vegetables vegan diet
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

 

When it comes to nutrition, I bet what you hear most often are carbs, proteins and fats. These are the macronutrients, but…are they all we need?

 

You might also have heard of micronutrients, such as vitamins and minerals. For many people, Micronutrients are not a big deal considering how easily accessible multi-vitamin supplements are nowadays.

 

So…If you are getting all you macros, plus taking those all-in-one vitamin supplementations, you have everything you need, right?

 

Well. Technically that’s what you need to live. Nutrients include carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins and minerals, all of which are essential to life. These are the basic requirements.

 

But… to live a healthy, disease-free life? Not quite enough.

 

Today’s topic is all about the powerful, under-appreciated phytonutrients.

  • What are they?
  • What can they do?
  • Where to get them?

 

There are also some important pointers and gifts at the end, make sure you go there and check them out!

 

What are phytonutrients?

 

“Phyto” comes from the Greek word for “plant”. Natural phytonutrients give plant foods their rich colour, tastes and smells.

 

Phytonutrients are technically not “nutrients”, but there is strong evidence that they play a crucial role in maintaining health and preventing diseases, including cancers. Discovering and utilising phytonutrients are part of a growing area of health and nutrition.

 

In my opinion (and perhaps some other health professionals), phytonutrients should be added to the definition of essential nutrients for healthy living. 

 

More than 900 phytonutrient compounds have been discovered and scientists are still uncovering more from the powerful plant kingdom. Some well-known phytonutrients are isoflavones in soy, lignans in flaxseed, beta-carotene in carrots, flavonoids in berries.

 

Benefits of phytonutrients

 

Long before phytonutrients were discovered, people began to notice that those who eat mostly plant foods are less likely to experience chronic diseases than those who consumed meat and processed foods.

 

In addition to the well-known benefits of plant foods including high fibre, low saturated fat, low sugar and salt, what else could be preventing diseases?

 

Phytonutrients – That’s right!

 

Phytonutrients can protect against diseases in a number of ways such as

  • Improving immune function
  • Stimulating enzymes that protect against toxins and carcinogens
  • Neutralising the free radicals that could damage DNA
  • Decreasing blood cholesterol level
  • Regulating blood glucose level

 

Some phytonutrients are extremely powerful because of their anti-oxidant and anti-diabetic properties. Flavonoids are one such example. Berries are rich in flavonoids and are highly recommended for healthy aging, diabetes control, fighting cancer and fat burning. 

 

We encourage you to check out Dr. Michael Greger‘s videos on flavonoids!

 

How do you get lots of phytonutrients?

 

It’s so simple –  The different colours reflect phytonutrients present in different plant foods. To ensure you get more phytonutrients, you simply need to eat a colourful plate of fruits, veggies and whole grains.

 

Is it really that simple? Yes, it is all about diversity and real plant foods. Nature has loaded so many health-promoting compounds into plant foods, we just need to appreciate them in the original form and minimise processing that may damage the structures of these compounds.

 

If you don’t believe me, here is a table released by Harvard Medical School.

 

Phytonutrients, Their Sources And Potential Benefits

Source: Harvard Medical School

 

Is there a magic phytonutrient pill?

 

Phytonutrients are great, and you have to get them the RIGHT way – eating a variety of plant foods. A pill just simply can’t do what real foods can.

 

A plant food may contain in itself more than 100 types of phytonutrients and they only provide the optimal benefits when consumed all together – a phenomenon known as synergy. When you are consuming a variety of plant foods, complex synergistic interactions are going in your body.

 

Attempting to take out particular elements is just not going to work. In fact, research has shown that for some people, taking beta-carotene supplementation can actually be harmful!

 

Remember – “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts“. This always holds true in the debate between supplementation or real foods.

 

A few more pointers

  • Eat at least 6 servings of fruits and vegetables a day!
  • Variety does not just apply to fruits and vegetables. Don’t just stick to one type of grain and miss out on the phytonutrients in different whole grains! Alternate between whole wheat, rice, oatmeal, whole-wheat couscous, triticale, spelt, buckwheat etc.
  • Eat phytonutrient-rich foods throughout the day to keep blood levels of these components constant. This way you get the most benefits.
  • It is so important to keep track of your lifestyle habits, you can download my lifestyle checklist and Food, symptom & mood diary on my Comprehensive Resources Page.

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

Get our FREE dietitian guidebook

* indicates required



 

References

Disease fighting phytonutrients, Harvard Medical School 

Phytonutrients for fall, Harvard Medical School

NutritionFacts.org

Phenomenal phytonutrients: the reason we need real food

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube

How much protein do you need and where to get it on a vegan diet? Myths and tips

vegan protein
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Does it drive you nuts the second someone tells you to eat more protein and not let your muscles waste away on a vegan diet?

Don’t worry, we’ve all been there. Well, next time someone is bugging you about muscle wastage, just show them these amazing vegan athletes! Mac Danzig, the vegan martial artist; Scott Jurek, the ultramarathon runner; Carl Lewis, the Olympic sprinter; Tia Blanco, the vegan surfer … The list goes on and believe it or not, they all switched from meat and dairy to plants!

So what’s the truth? Do vegans get enough protein? From where? Is it possible to have muscle gains on a vegan diet?

This article is the result of hours of literature research so that every piece of information is accurate and accountable. We hope it helps you out.

The health benefits of a plant-based diet

Extensive research has shown that a plant-based diet is undeniably good for our health. It could stave off the typical modern diseases such as high blood pressure, cholesterol, heart diseases, diabetes, obesity and even some forms of cancer!

Unlike animal foods, plant foods are naturally low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. Instead, they are loaded with vitamins, minerals, anti-oxidants and thousands of other phytonutrients. Some of them are disease-fighting, anti-aging compounds unique to the plant kingdom.

Did you know that what we feed to the gut is also so crucial to the microbes in our digestive tract and largely determines the metabolites they produce? When animal products make up the bulk of your diet, inflammatory metabolites could be produced and lead to inflammation. Research has shown that the production of a detrimental compound, TMAO, increases from consuming high animal proteins and salt. Increased TMAO is associated with heart disease, diabetes, cancer and vascular dementia. In contrast, fibre has been shown to reduce TMAO and protect against heart diseases! To read original science articles on this, just go to the references section.

Can a vegan diet provide enough protein?

Okay okay plants are good. But can I get enough protein for muscle building? Can plants really fuel my workouts and recovery?

At the end of the day, you could build muscle on any diet, as long as you consume adequate and high quality calories, combined with exercise routines.

So, where can you get proteins?

Beans, lentils, tofu, soy products, nuts and seeds generally contain the most proteins. Some grains including quinoa, millet and amaranth also provide some protein.

Image result for plant protein per 100g

Source: http://vinchaylabs.com/plant-protein-chart/

How much protein do I need everyday?

If you are thinking, these plant foods can hardly keep me full, how can they possibly provide all the protein for athletic performance?

Well the truth is: A vegan diet can easily meet the protein needs in your body. And the good news is – You can easily calculate it online with a simple tool Vegan Protein Calculator.

I just quickly ran my data on the calculator and got some back my results within seconds!

2 methods were used to calculate the protein requirements to give a better indication of how much I need. The first method is based on calories but not athletic goals, whereas the second is based on body weight, a common method used by athletes.

So combining the 2 methods, I should aim for 70 to 95 grams of protein per day, with a minimum of 49 grams.

Now that I know exactly how much protein I need, where do I find them? Easy – just use the Plant protein chart above to plan out your meals. In the beginning, you might find it a chore, but I guarantee you that once you get into the habit of doing it, it hardly takes any effort!

A nice bonus that comes with this very handy protein calculator is that it also tells me all about how many calories I need to consume on a rest day or a workout day.

In order for protein to support muscle health, meeting daily calorie requirement is necessary. Otherwise, some of the protein in the diet will be used to fuel basic bodily functions rather than muscle building and repair.

What about “Protein quality” and “Complete protein” ?

Wait, what? Proteins aren’t all the same?

YES. Proteins are not all the same because they are made up of different combinations of amino acids – the building blocks of protein. You might have heard of the term “Complete Protein”. One common misconception regarding vegan diet is that plant foods don’t provide the whole suite of amino acids.

OK. What’s the real truth here? There are 20 amino acids that make up the building blocks of protein.  The good news is that our body makes 11 of them from existing molecules in our body, so we only need make sure we consume the rest the nine that our body cannot make. The nine amino acids that we need to get from our diet are called the essential amino acids.

As Dr. Gregor points out in the video “The Protein Combining Myth“, the only “incomplete protein” in the food chain is gelatin as it is missing one amino acid, Tryptophan. Therefore, as long as you are consuming sufficient calories, you don’t need to worry about the protein deficiency myth at all.

As for any other nutrient deficiency, this rule of thumb applies – We need to eat a variety of foods. At the end of the day, we get all of the amino acids and other nutrients we need from the whole bunch of foods we eat. This is exactly why Vegan Palette is called this name – We want your food plate to be like a palette with a variety of foods. 

Is there still a need for protein combining?

The myth that plant proteins are incomplete, is completely misleading. As such, there really isn’t a need to deliberately combine proteins. Plus, our body has a powerful system of recycling amino acids and converting among them to make sure we have a balanced pool of all amino acids at all times. This is an excellent example of how our body maintains Homeostasis.

Conclusion

In summary, plant proteins are in no way inferior to animal proteins. Plus, Plant proteins also don’t have the same pro-inflammatory and cancer-promoting effects as animal proteins. If you stick to the rule of “Palette”, and have a wide variety of healthy whole foods, your body will happily thrive and let you accomplish bigger things.

Are you now more confident that you can meet all protein requirement now? Have you tried the Super handy tool Vegan Protein Calculator yet?

 

Let us know how your gut health journey goes from here. Comment below what you liked about this article, and what topic you would like us to cover next! 

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

Get our FREE dietitian guidebook

* indicates required



 

References

1. Nowinski A & Ufnal M. (2018). Trimethylamine N-oxide: A harmful, protective or diagnostic marker in lifestyle diseases? Nutrition 46: 7 – 12.

2. Kruger R, Merz B, Rist MJ, et al. (2017). Associations of current diet with plasma and urine TMAO in the KarMeN study: direct and indirect contributions. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 61(11).

3. Cho CE, & Caudill MA. (2017). Trimethylamine-N-Oxide: Friend, foe, or simply caught in the cross-fire? Trends in Endocrinolology & Metabolism: 28(2): 121-130.

4. Koeth RA, Wang Z, Levison BS, et al. (2013). Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis. Nat Med 19(5):576-585.

5. Li Q, Wu T, Liu R, et al. (2017). Soluble dietary fiber reduces trimethylamine metabolism via gut microbiota and co-regulates host AMPK pathways. Molecular Nutrition Food Research 61(12).

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube