Combating diabetes: latest research and approaches

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What is the most important factor when it comes to diabetes genetics, sugar, calories, insulin

 

A few years ago, we may say sugar and insulin, but new research has dramatically changed what we know about diabetes.

 

“Fat, get out of the way and let me pump my sugar!” – Insulin.

 

It turns out that the fat in animal products and oils prevent insulin from doing its critical job – moving glucose into cells, lowering blood sugar level, and keeping us healthy.

 

In other words, what caused your diabetes or made it worse is not just your refined white bread or sugary drinks, but also the mayo dressing or cheese slices that you eat all the time!

 

Experiments on mice have shown that when fat is reduced from the diet, insulin can function properly, alleviating and eventually curing Type II diabetes!

 

Therefore, a low-fat, plant-based diet is the best for diabetes and conditions associated with it, such as heart disease, obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

Has this been shown in humans?

 

Yes. One study found that 21 of 23 patients on oral medications and 13 of 17 patients on insulin did not need their medications after 26 days on a near-vegetarian diet and exercise program.

These dietary changes are simple, but the effects they had are profound, both on a short-term and long-term scale. However, Dr. Neal Barnard from Physicians Committee of Responsible medicine points out that “choosing skinless chicken, skim milk, and baked fish is not enough of a change for most people to beat diabetes”. A plant-based diet is necessary if you are serious about diabetes.

How to combat diabetes with a dietary approach?

Go plant-based and throw out animal products.

Make your meals with whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Drink water. Keep nuts
or seeds to a small handful every day. The amount that you sprinkle on your breakfast oatmeal is sufficient. Avoid animal products of all sorts to avoid saturated fats. You can easily get your protein and fat intake with balanced plant-based meals so don’t worry. Plus, there are plenty of resources on our page that can help you, such as this food plate from Vegan Palette.
vegan Food Plate

Avoid vegetable oil too.

Although vegetable oils are healthier compared to animal fats, they should still be avoided. All fats and oils are high in calories – 1g of any fat or oil has 9 calories, whereas 1g of carbohydrate has only 4 calories. We only need a small amount each day and it is so easy to go overboard in the modern days. Remember to watch out for oily sauces and dressings. Also, don’t assume you can eat as many avocados and nuts as you want! Check out this video by an accredited dietitian, nutritionist Raymond from Vegan Palette :”Why eating plant-based means giving up oil“.

Read food labels! 

Don’t be fooled by the packaging. Food industries can print “Low-calories”, “Low fat” in big block letters and fool you into thinking they are healthy. Always check the back and choose foods with no more than 2-3g of fat per serving if you are serious about not getting diabetes.

Avoid high GI foods.

The glycemic index (GI) identifies foods that tend to raise blood sugar. These include white rice, white and wheat bread, corn flakes, puffed rice cereals, and most commercial cereals. Swap them with low GI foods, such as oats, sweet potations, natural pasta, beans and so on. Instead of rice, you can eat quinoa. Instead of white bread, you can eat rye bread, multigrain brain, and sourdough.

Lots and lots of fibre

Fibre is literally the best thing about plant-based diets. They are the natural cleaners for your blood vessels and digestive system. If you follow the above advice and eat plenty of plant foods, you will easily get at least 40g of fibre per day. You should aim for at least 40g of fibre each day. When reading food labels, check if there is at least 3g of fiber per serving.

To learn more about diabetes and get started fixing it with a plant-based dietary approach, we recommend these resources:

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Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

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Is bread healthy? How to select wisely with these simple tricks

bread
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I love bread. Who doesn’t like watching bread take its shape in the oven, while smelling that appetising hot air? Finally, that long awaited bread is ready, you take it out of the oven, and sprinkle some cinnamon – perfect.

 

We are not alone. Bread has been consumed for over 30,000 years. It is THE MOST popular food in the whole wide world.

 

It makes sense that bread arose early in the human history as an excellent source of nutrition since a traditional loaf requires only 4 ingredients: flour, yeast, water and salt. For natural leavens or sourdoughs, yeast is even unnecessary.

 

The bread we are eating today

 

“What? Just 4 ingredients? What is that long list of ingredients at the back of the bread I buy then?”

white bread ingredients

Source: Cole’s Whole-Grain Cinnamon French Toast

 

Take the white bread as an example. You would think that the ingredient list should look simple, but unfortunately it is not.

 

Nowadays, bread is not just bread anymore. The simplest white bread has over 30 ingredients, many of them an ordinary person can’t even pronounce. In fact, white bread isn’t even nutritionally worth it to consume, as it is so deprived of nutrients and fibre during the heaving processing. I recommend you watch Dr. Michael Greger‘s video on Is white bread good for you?

 

If bread only takes 4 ingredients to make, what are all these things doing there? Probably to make the bread appear ultra white, smooth, light, soft and even stay on the shelf for weeks. I don’t think we want those things in our bodies.

 

Well, white bread is bad because it is so cheap. But what about the more expensive ones that claim to be healthier?

abbotts bread ingredients

 

The Abbott’s bread is a popular “healthy choice” in Australia. Now the ingredient list looks more like comprehensible language, indeed much better. But still, what are maltodextrin, emulsifiers and flavouring powders doing there?

 

It is extremely hard to find simple, authentic bread made of just the ingredients necessary. This is just an example of over-processing in the modern food industry.

 

Should we just stop eating bread? That’s not what i am suggesting. Baked bread is an excellent source of iodine, and whole-grain bread with little processing is excellent. Research has shown that 3 portions of whole gains can reduce the risk of getting a heart attack by 15%, and the risk of getting a stroke by roughly 25%.

 

It just takes some effort to find bread that is actually good for you. But we are going to teach you how!

 

What bread should you really be eating?

If the original recipe for bread is simply 4 ingredients, then it makes sense that we should aim to get bread that is made that way. In other words – get as close to the original recipe as possible.

 

Instead of going to supermarket, try a local bakery and ask the baker what the ingredients are. The bakers tend to use real flour, instead of the “enriched” or “refined” flour that is commonly used in commercial bread.

 

Note that for people who are trying to control their blood sugar levels, definitely stay away from enriched or refined white flour, as they can make your blood sugar to spike.

 

In contrast, natural whole grains are nutrient-dense, more satiating and is much milder on blood sugar level. Be careful though, that many commercial bread put words like “multi-grain“, “whole-grain” at the front of their packaging but are actually misleading. Flip over the bread and look at the ingredient list to see if those are false claims.

 

A simple math trick to distinguish between true whole-grain bread and false claims

One way you can quickly distinguish between authentic whole-grain bread and false claims is this simple math trick: if the serving size ratio of carbohydrates to fibre is equal to or less than 5 to 1 (eg. 15g of carbs and 3g of fibre), this bread passes the whole-grain test. If the ratio ends up being something like 18, which is not uncommon for many brands, put the bread back onto the shelf.

 

This simple 5 to 1 rule comes from Dr. Michael Gregor and can be used for other things too such as breakfast cereal. Don’t ever believe what the front package claims without performing this test yourself!

 

Sourdough breads 

 

Another healthy option, especially for people who are gluten-sensitive is sourdough. This is the bread that Ikarians eat. Ikaria is one of the world’s blue zones (places with the highest life expectancy). Ikaria has even been called the island where people forget to die! One secret is that ikarians eat true sourdough bread that is fermented not with bakers yeast but lactobacilli, a beneficial naturally-occurring bacterial strain. The resulting bread is slightly more sour in taste, but has less gluten and a naturally longer shelf life. It is nutrient-rich and slow burning, excellent for those who want to lost fat.

 

However, it is common to find fake sourdough breads in stores nowadays. If they still contain yeast or sweetener, they are not true sourdough breads. Go to a local bakery and ask for how their sourdough bread is made. Of course, the best solution is to just make you own. Here is a recipe from the Blue Zones website.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, this post is not to discourage you from eating bread. Good whole-grain bread is beneficial for you but you need to select wisely. Choose bread with fewer ingredients, ideally baked fresh in a local bakery. Always have a chat with the baker to see how the bread is made, especially when you are looking for true sourdough breads – they can be tricky to find. Use the simple “5 to 1 carbs to fibre” rule to distinguish between true whole-grain bread and false claims. If you can implement these simple tricks to select your bread, you can enjoy the pleasures of bread as well as the health benefits!

 

References

https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/050113p44.shtml

https://nutritionfacts.org/2018/05/08/follow-the-5-to-1-rule-for-packaged-foods/

https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-white-bread-good-for-you/

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

 

 

 

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Map of the Vegan services in Brisbane

Vegan Palette Resource_ vegan services map brisbane
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Inspired by the Map of the Queensland innovation ecosystem, I created a special map for the vegans in Brisbane!

 

The Map of Services Available for Vegans – Brisbane is here to support all current vegans and those transitioning to a vegan lifestyle. The purpose of this map is to make the services and initiatives more visible to support vegan experience in Brisbane.

 

My hope is that by showing how extensive our support network is, more fellow vegans and vegan-curious friends will be excited to be on a journey of Health, Love, and Purpose.

 

Vegan Palette Resource_ vegan services map brisbane

 

This map captures both local and online services offered by national, international vegan communities, local business and societies, education institutions, non-governmental organisations, individual and group activities in Brisbane.

 

Work in progress and missing logos

There are so many great organisations involved that support a vegan’s journey. Some will be missed from the map, and many embarrassingly obvious. If this is you, I am really sorry, please comment below or send me an email at raymond@veganpalette.com.

 

Scope and context

The scope of the map is Brisbane, but also includes some services in Queensland, or worldwide. I highly recommend each region to have their own version of the map, to improve vegan experience Australia wide. Please feel free to use this map as a template.

Next steps

The map is not perfect, and I am sure there are missing services. But in the interest of shipping over perfect, it will do for this release and I will keep updating it based on your feedback.

Your feedback is welcome and appreciated. Please contact me via one of the following means:

Email: raymond@veganpalette.com

Facebook: @veganpalette

Instagram: @askveganpalette

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

 

 

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Who are at risk for iodine deficiency and how to prevent it on a vegan diet

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While it is common for vegans to worry about B12, Iodine doesn’t get nearly as much attention. You’ll soon get to learn about some surprising facts about iodine from this post and know what to do to avoid iodine deficiency.

 

Iodine is crucial for the production of thyroid hormones. Deficiency can lead to thyroid enlargement. Pregnant women, in particular, need to pay close attention as inadequate iodine can harm the growth of the developing foetus.

 

Since vegans replace cow’s milk with various plant milk, one concern is that the lower iodine content in plant milk puts vegans at higher risk of iodine deficiency. Is this true that veganism is the reason for iodine deficiency and non-vegans are safe from it?

 

First of all, even the non-vegans are not getting as much iodine out of milk since the dairy industry has stopped using iodine-based disinfectant for cleaning milking equipment. So definitely don’t subscribe to the claim that drinking cow’s milk keeps you safe from iodine deficiencies. In fact, Australians on average have median iodine intake (only about 100mcg!), which makes us mildly iodine deficient. Everyone needs to be more aware of their iodine intake!

 

Here are the iodine intake recommendations:

  • 150mcg   Adults
  • 220mcg  Pregnant women
  • 270mcg  Breast feeding women
  • 90mcg    Children aged 1-8 years old
  • 1000mcg recommended upper limit of intake (too much is toxic too!)

 

Let’s take a look at what other factors can affect iodine levels in people.

 

1. Regional soil

Due to lower soil iodine levels in the South East Australia, children have lower iodine levels when compared to those from Queensland and Western Australia.

 

2. Processed food industry

Iodised salt is an excellent source for iodine, except it is not used as much as the old days. Instead, it is often replaced by all sorts of other processed food flavors, chemicals, that achieve the same or better taste, without the added iodine.

 

3. People avoiding bread on low-carb diets

Believe it or not, the iodine deficiency problem is addressed by legislation that requires bakers to use iodised salt in bread. Therefore, having whole-grain bread is recommended. Nowadays, carb is still falsely perceived as “The devil for weight” in many people’s minds. While it is true that white bread is unhealthy as it is highly refined and poor in nutrition, whole-grain bread is excellent for your nutrition.

 

So how can we ensure adequate iodine intake?

A true whole food, plant-based diet.

By that, I don’t mean processed vegan junk food, grain-free, low-carb diet, but a truly balanced diet that focuses on a variety of whole foods, minimally processed and covering all the essential food groups. For more information on what these food groups are, visit my comprehensive Resources page after this post.

 

Dietitian recommendations on how to avoid iodine deficiency

  • While too much salt is certainly bad for you, do use iodised salt and bake bread with iodised salt on a diet that is low in salt. Completely eliminating salt from your diet is not recommended.
  • Seaweed products are a rich source of iodine.  I recommend Nori (40mcg per 2.5g sheet), wakame (250mcg/g) and dulse (~125mcg/g).

Nori to avoid iodine deficiencywakame to avoid iodine deficiencydulse to avoid iodine deficiency

 

  • For some, getting iodine from diet is simply not enough, be it vegan or other diets. Women who are breastfeeding, pregnant or planning to become pregnant should be extra conscious of iodine. First, have the iodine status checked with a doctor. Or, take a small iodine supplement providing 75-150mgs of iodine everyday.

 

Conclusion

It is certainly untrue that vegans are the only people at risk for iodine deficiency. In fact, the average Australian is mildly deficient! Therefore, drinking cow’s milk is not a safeguard to high iodine level. It is just another false claim from the dairy industry, unfortunately. Keep plant powered folks, and sprinkle a little iodised salt on your amazing plant foods!

 

For more information, I highly recommend Dr. Michael Greger’s videos

 

Feel free to let us know your personal journey on this, our Brisbane-based accredited practicing dietitian, nutritionist is here to help! You can learn about our services and how to get in touch.

 

References

Plant based Health Australia

National Health and Medical Research Council

Nutrition Australia

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

 

 

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