Cheat Day Vegan Burgers in Brisbane (mouth-watering photos included)

As much as we encourage everyone to live a whole food plant-based lifestyle to the best of our ability, there might just be those days when you want to treat yourself to a vegan burger.

Or you might want to impress your vegan-curious friends that vegan burgers might actually taste better!

It’s great to see more places adopting vegan options on their menus, and more good news – the vegan options are slowly getting upgraded to plant-based!

Let’s take a look at 5 vegan burger places we went to in Brisbane and Bryon bay!

Brewski

On Brewski’s menu, you will find the “Burgers for the plant-based” section with 5 amazing burgers:

  • BEEFLESS BURGER
  • VEGAN CHEESEBURGER
  • PULLED JACKFRUIT BURGER
  • ABC BURGER
  • PLANT SMASH BURGER

Their top seller beefless burger is also my personal favorite, but I’m sure you will find others just as amazing.

I also had to include their vegan nachos here because it beats all the nachos I’ve ever had!!

Besides the most amazing food, I also had a lovely chat with Antoinette, who told me all the effort that went into sourcing ingredients locally to reduce the environmental impacts of importing mock meat. I was so glad to hear that all the ingredients were ethically sourced, with lots of consideration concerning health, safety, and environment!

Highly recommend Brewski for your Friday nights, birthdays and any functions 🙂

Find Brewski on Facebook and Instagram.

Just Poppy’s

If you are going to try out every burger on Just Poppy’s menu, it’s gonna take you a lifeeeeetimeeee.

I’ve never seen a burger place with shocking 13 vegan burgers!

Certainly would keep your tastebuds satisfied if you are sharing different burgers with friends 😛

I loved the Catch of the day (fishless fish) and was blown away by how real the “fish” patty tasted! Definitely a treat for someone who used to love fish.

Plenty of plant-based, minimally unprocessed burgers such as Hommos to god, which uses a chickpea patty, The plant-based disgrace with a black bean and beetroot patty.

Just Poppy’s also has the most beautiful vegan platter, perfect for a group of animal lovers!

OH!! And this one is SPECIAL – Potato Portato using scallops as buns! – Very unique, very creative, very delicious!

Find Just Poppy’s on facebook and Instagram.

Grassfed

Grassfed is a new burger joint tucked away in the Fish Lane, brought to you by the amazing I Should Coco man behind the Brisbane vegan market scene.

They offer very affordable vegan burgers, as well as coconut-based icecreams!

This one is their biggest and most popular B.F.C burger, which will definitely make you happy on a cheat day.

Find Grassfed on facebook and Instagram.

VeganBurgz

How cool is a green burger?

I know. These green burgers just look so appetizing!

Stacks on was one of the 11 amazing vegan burgers and my favorite as it uses mushroom and eggplant instead of a processed patty!

Sweet-kale Roline is another must-try, made of sweet potato, chia seed patty, onions rings and kale!

Find VeganBurgz on facebook and Instagram.

Elixiba

Best is saved to the last!! Elixiba is the ultimate plant-based burger you can dream of – The bridge between health and social life.

It is currently located in Byron Bay and Sunshine Coast, but I’ve heard rumors that they will be coming to Brisbane soon!! Fingers crossed.

Hemp patty, jackfruit, massive sweet potato chips! All so yummy and healthy!

Elixiba also offers a range of other plant-based dishes that I wouldn’t call cheat meals, all made from healthy whole foods, satisfying both your taste buds and nutrition!

Find Elixiba on facebook and Instagram.

There you have it – 5 burger places you can go to on your cheat day! Remember not to do these toooooo often and base most of your daily foods around plant-based foods in their whole form 🙂

Remember – A small step towards plant-based vegan is a big step for health, environment and animals!

All photos are taken by Raymond, the vegan dietitian and photography enthusiast at Vegan Palette! Show your love for vegan and plant-based cafes/restaurants to encourage more people to try out the vegan options 🙂 If you own a vegan restaurant/cafe and would like a professional photoshoot/menu design/nutritional advice with Vegan Palette, please get in touch at raymond@veganpalette.com or our Facebook, Instagram, Website.

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? We have a bunch of support materials waiting for you including a dietitian guidebook, lifestyle checklists and assessments, and the best vegan websites we recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author
healthy vegan palette writer Rainie

Rainie is a health, fitness and nutrition enthusiastic. She studied a bachelor of Biomedical Sciences degree to learn all about the human body and continued to pursue higher research training in a neuroscience laboratory to investigate how the brain develops. Rainie is now using the research skills she learned in the science degree to bring evidence-based nutrition practice to more health-conscious people.

 

 

10 nutritious vegan staples for your pantry

Is an empty pantry your trigger for ordering some quick but unhealthy vegan fast food?

Do your staples include all the important nutrients?

Don’t worry, we came up with a list of 10 nutritious vegan staples that will nourish your body, and bring you amazing flavours!

Of course, 10 is no way near the variety we should be having. Fresh veggies, leafy greens and fruits should always be in your house, so we are not including them here. Instead, this list is for you to check if any of them is a surprise to you!

You will see “… of all colours” a lot in the list because some of the most amazing foods such as quinoa come in more than one colour. We often get questions like which colour is the best nutritionally and the recommendation we give is – Mix it up and eat them all!

Here we go!

Oats

vegan oats

Oats are not boring – they are probably one of the most versatile foods! You can make oatmeal, overnight oats, pancakes, cookies and even pizza crust with it. My view of oats was completely transformed after finding the ‘Oat Queen’ Maddie on Youtube. She cooks anything and everything with oats – soak, cook, bake, blend! You need to check out her recipes page and ebook “ALWAYS OATS”.

You might also ask which type of oat is the best? Steel cut oats are the least processed and most nutritious one, but take longer to cook. Rolled oats are softer and easy to make oatmeals with, also a good choice. Try to avoid instant oats if you can as they are the most processed. Here is an article that explains the different processing of these oats.

Sweet potatoes of all colours

vegan sweet potato

Purple, yellow, red, white, have you tried all of them? My personal favorite is yellow sweet potato, they taste the softest and sweetest to me. But of course, different colours indicate different nutritional profiles and you should definitely mix them up. Sweet potatoes are so easy to make yummy – chuck in the oven and come back when you smell them! Sadly they have gotten a bad rep because of the false information on carbs and weight gain, which couldn’t be further from the truth! Sweet potatoes are high in water and very filling, which actually makes them perfect for weight loss.

Give yourself a 5 minute Sweet potato facts 101 and you’ll be surprised by how nutritious and beneficial they are! Sweet potatoes even show anti-cancer potential as Dr. Michael Greger explains it here. Check out this amazing recipe on vegan stuffed sweet potatoes!

Berries of all colours

vegan berries

If you don’t have some fresh or frozen berries in your kitchen, you definitely need to stack them up. Their anti-oxidant levels are through the roof. Berries are also amazing brain foods, counteract the toxicity of pesticides, inhibit platelet aggregation, and reduce muscle soreness! Blueberries are especially beneficial for lowering cholesterol and heart health. When fresh berries are not in season, simply keep some frozen berries in the freezer. You can make healthy smoothies and berry jam with them!

Beans of all colours

vegan beans

Most people don’t eat enough beans and legumes, missing out on their amazing benefits for heart health, and a longer lifespan! Beans are highly filling foods, full of complex carbs, fibre, and protein. You might not have much time to soak and slow cook beans, but you can always easily get canned beans with BPA-free lining! Through your beans generously to salads, stews, and Buddha bowls. The best thing about beans? They make the most amazing sauce: Vegan hummus!

So many recipes with beans, so many!!

Quinoa of all colours

vegan quinoa

Did you know that the UN named 2013 ‘International Quinoa Year’ to highlight quinoa’s high nutrient content? It has twice the protein content of rice or barley and is an amazing source of calcium, magnesium, manganese, B vitamins, vitamin E and fibre. Quinoa is one of the least allergenic  ‘grains’, a good wheat alternative. Quinoa also has an excellent amino acid profile with all nine essential amino acids, making it a complete protein source. So many more benefits of quinoa are listed here. Don’t know how to cook them? Check out these 17 vegan quinoa recipes!

Plant milk of all kinds

vegan plant milk

Before I went vegan, I only ever drank cow’s milk or cow’s milk powder. I never knew this whole new world of soymilk, rice milk, almond milk, cashew milk, coconut milk, hemp milk, oat milk, flax milk, hazelnut milk and pea milk! It’s a crazy discovery! You can even learn to make your own plant-based milk – healthy, cruelty-free and inflammation-free.

Brazil nut

vegan brazil nut

Just like the eye-opening variety of plant-based milk, Brazil nut is another discovery after veganism. It is the richest known food source of Selenium and has many other benefits, an essential mineral for a healthy immune system and nervous system! If you are experiencing any sort of inflammation, get a brazil nut a day. Be aware not to consume more than that though as too much Selenium is not good either.

Garlic

vegan garlic

Garlic is used a lot in Asian cooking for good reasons – they bring out amazing flavours and also have many health benefits. Garlic and flavonoid phytonutrients found in fruits, vegetables, nuts, and grains can counteract the mutagenic chemicals found in cooked meat.  Interestingly, consumption of small amounts of garlic or raisins may even lower the risk of premature birth. Garlic is also a natural food against lead poisoning and platelet activation. Small amounts of garlic are already powerful, why not just put a few gloves in your stew or stirfry? Check out these 12 Vegan garlic recipes.

Veggie pasta

vegan pasta

What?! Veggie pasta? Yes you heard me right.

Did you know there is pasta made from black beans, chickpeas, edamame, peas? Most of the pasta that you buy off the shelf used processed flour, which is nowhere near as good as using plant-based alternative ingredients! You might want to go to a local farmer’s market or organic health food store to find these pastas though. Here are some vegan pasta recipes for you 🙂

Edamame

vegan edamame

The last one may seem odd – edamame? What even is it?

Edamame are basically just young soybeans harvested before ripe that you can buy shelled or in the pod, often in the frozen section of Asian supermarkets. They are gluten-free, low in calories, contain no cholesterol, added sugar and lots of protein, iron and calcium. You might be surprised that tofu is not in this list as a protein staple, guess what, edamame is more nutritious than tofu! So easy to make to, you only need to steam them with a few minutes and there you have them.

When in doubt, start with this beautiful edamame quinoa salad!

 

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? We have a bunch of support materials waiting for you including a dietitian guidebook, lifestyle checklists and assessments, and the best vegan websites we recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author
healthy vegan palette writer Rainie

Rainie is a health, fitness and nutrition enthusiastic. She studied a bachelor of Biomedical Sciences degree to learn all about the human body and continued to pursue higher research training in a neuroscience laboratory to investigate how the brain develops. Rainie is now using the research skills she learned in the science degree to bring evidence-based nutrition practice to more health-conscious people.

Inflammatory foods are misunderstood and the truth about food sensitivity

vegan gut health inflammatory food

Do you love onions, but find yourself a little bloated after eating them?

What about pizza and tomato sauce? Do they give you a heartburn every time?

Or maybe just sparkling water or brussels sprouts can make you feel gassy?

It’s likely that you’ve had these symptoms, perhaps with other food, even “healthy food“. You wouldn’t usually connect the mild symptoms to food, and realize they are a distress signal.

This distress signal is usually a sign that your body is rejecting the food and having a hard time digesting it. War is happening and inflammation is the result.

inflammatory foods

Is there a way out? Yes, but you might not like it – Leave out the foods that your body doesn’t like, even if they are your favorite.

However, this list of “To avoid foods” will be different for everyone. There is no one bucket for inflammatory foods. Our bodies respond differently to the same foods.

Maybe your body doesn’t respond well to the “healthy foods” such as olive and garlic, they might even be labeled anti-inflammatory! 

But understand that those labels are based just on their nutritional makeups and the effect on the average population. What might be healthy for others might be inflammatory for you, and vice versa.

Food intolerance, allergy, or sensitivity?

These are three different things.

Food intolerance is when your body lacks certain enzymes to break down certain proteins. An example is lactose intolerance. People who are lactose intolerant lack the lactase enzyme. What’s the solution? Avoid milk and dairy products, substitute with plant milk.

Food allergies and sensitivities are due to an overreacting immune system. Allergies are immediate and can be life-threatening at times. Common food allergies include nuts, eggs, and shellfish.

Food sensitivities are usually milder and can be delayed by hours to days, depending on how much of the suspect food you ingested. Some common symptoms of food sensitivities include: bloating, cramps, sneezing, headache, fatigue, joint or muscle pain. It is easy to miss these symptoms as they are not necessarily related to digestion and therefore linked to food.

Are you sensitive to certain foods?

When people talk about inflammatory foods, what they are really talking about are food sensitivities, not intolerances or allergies.

The tricky part is that food sensitivities can be hard to pinpoint. You can’t just get a skin or blood test, like you can with allergies.

Food sensitivities have symptoms that can vary and be easily confused with other health conditions. But from now on, you can be more mindful and catch some foods that you are sensitive to.

How?

Once you’ve cleaned up your diet and excluded the foods that you are sensitive to, you will naturally feel better and those symptoms will disappear. Next time you get symptoms of sensitivity, think about what foods you ate and do a trial and error style eliminating to see by getting rid of which food, you can avoid the symptoms.

Trial and error? Wouldn’t this take forever?

Well, nailing down the best foods for your unique body is not an easy job!

But, there are some obvious foods that doctors agree on you should reduce or eliminate. So you can start with these:

  • sugar, syrup, soft drinks
  • refined carbs (white breads, white rice, refined pasta)
  • fried foods, even if it’s king oster mushrooms fried with olive oil!
  • all kinds of fats and oil

junk processed food

Once you’ve cut out this obvious list, you will likely feel a lot better already. But like I said, even on the “healthy foods” list, there might be foods that your particular body doesn’t cope well with.

Now is time to really pay close attention to any symptoms after eating particular foods. You’ll find yourself being a detective, sorting through every little thing that you put in your body. Don’t be frustrated, you are doing your body a huge favor.

A food diary really helps! You can find a “Food, Symptom and Mood Diary” on our Resources page. Write everything down, even if you think they are unlikely. Every food is innocent until proven guilty, so even the “healthiest” food should not be ruled out. Remember, if it is considered healthy, but doesn’t work well with your body, then it is not good for you and don’t force yourself to eat it.

What’s labeled “superfood”, “healthfood” out there, may have some nutrition evidence, but keep in mind – they are out their also because they are profitable! Just look at coconut oil, it was claimed to be a “superfood” for so many health problems, yet after more research, it turns out it’s just another fad. I have a blog on this called “Why can’t food scientists agree on coconut oil?” if you want to read more.

Being a detective in your own life

Don’t focus on the hard efforts you have to put in each day to keep track of all the food, instead, focus on how much better your body feels after eliminating the foods you are sensitive too. You are going to be in this detective game for a while, but not forever. Soon you will find yourself more energetic and less grumpy.

Of course, don’t end up at the conclusion that your body loves chips, meats, processed foods because you feel awesome after eating them. The natural body reactions we are talking about in this article DO NOT equal addictive feelings! You know that those processed foods are there to trigger the reward center in your brain and overwrite the true responses. Eliminate them without a question!

Over time, your plate should look whole food and plant based. Your body will heal as you make these changes. Your goal is to feed yourself the right foods that really nurture your body and mind, to prevent chronic inflammation, the crappy feelings it brings. Chronic inflammation is the root cause for many long-term diseases, so don’t overlook the mild symptoms!

Start paying attention to what you put in your mouth. And feel free to let our dietitian take a look at your food diary!

happy healthy energetic plant based vegan

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? We have a bunch of support materials waiting for you including a dietitian guidebook, lifestyle checklists and assessments, and the best vegan websites we recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author
healthy vegan palette writer Rainie

Rainie is a health, fitness and nutrition enthusiastic. She studied a bachelor of Biomedical Sciences degree to learn all about the human body and continued to pursue higher research training in a neuroscience laboratory to investigate how the brain develops. Rainie is now using the research skills she learned in the science degree to bring evidence-based nutrition practice to more health-conscious people.

 

The simple act of eating healthy plant based holds promise to depression prevention

Said not me, but a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

. . .

Last month I went to a career networking event – nothing about the event itself changed, but I did.

I’ve always liked going to events for the extra perk of getting free food. I didn’t care about whether they are junk food because free = good.

But over the last year, I have become a lot more mindful about the food I put into my body, after reading research articles on the health implications of the standard American diet, processed food, meat, and dairy


I was constantly in shock of how much misinformation we hold regarding health. I mean, just look at the number of fad diets out there if you don’t believe me!

I got to the networking event. Everyone was having a great time with alcohol and free food. In the past, I would too. But I wasn’t so happy looking at the food options — all sorts of deep fried finger foods: spring rolls, chicken wings, beef pies, pork dim sims, chicken nuggets, fries 


fried-chicken

Everyone else looked so happy, voluntarily ingesting one piece after another, while sipping some delicious alcohol.

But 
 are we really happy?

According to the World Health Organization, 300 million people around the world have depression. Nearly 50% of all people diagnosed with depression also experience an anxiety disorder. It’s estimated that 15% of the adult population will experience depression at some point in life.

I am not saying that bad eating habits and unhealthy food cause depression (although likely true), but it is a common practice for depressed people to indulge in some addictively yummy junk food — ice cream, chips, soft drinks etc. Once it becomes a habit, the occasional cheat meals naturally become the default, even when we are not feeling depressed.

And what does that lead to?

Unhealthy diet contributes to approximately 678,000 deaths each year in the U.S. due to nutrition- and obesity-related diseases, including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. 1 In the last 30 years, obesity rates have doubled in adults, tripled in children, and quadrupled in adolescents.

Does what we put into our body affect how we feel, physically and mentally? Of course it does! When you don’t treat your car nicely by giving it the cheapest, crappiest fuel, will you expect it to run far?

broken car analogy to food

One day, the car will break down because of all the crap it was fed. You will have to dump in a lot of money to fix it, just like fixing depression and anxiety with a bunch of drugs that don’t always work.

But
why didn’t you just put in some good fuel in the first place?

The effects of healthy diets on mood have been known for some time but many people (including doctors) will rather turn to the “safer” option of medications to treat disorders like depression. This is often simply because the impact of dietary modification as a treatment or intervention strategy is not straightforward to quantify and the evidence seems to be “up in the air”.

But, a new Australian study has looked at 16 randomized control trials with outcome data for 45,826 participants and come back with a simple, clear message:

“If you want to feel better, eat less junk.”

What we call “comfort food”, high in sugar and fat, activate our brain’s reward center. This is just similar to smoking and drug addiction — while we may feel some temporary pleasure, it doesn’t benefit us in the long run.

Instead, eating nutrient-dense foods that are high in fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals, while reducing processed foods with refined sugars are truly beneficial, in the short and long term. Health-promoting whole foods should be consumed daily, in great variety and abundantly.

How should your plate look like?

A variety of plant-based whole foods: vegetables, leafy greens, fruits, legumes, grains making up a colorful palette.

vegan palette food plate

While further research is always required to understand the specific mechanisms underlying the effect, we are slowly getting a more comprehensive picture of how food affects the whole body, one that includes our massive gut microbiome. Changing what we eat firstly affects the plethora of bacteria living in our bellies.

While the finding that “Junk food is bad, plants are good” isn’t so new, this meta-analysis is still a significant step forward in really implementing dietary interventions for mood disorders such as depression.

If you are already eating plant-based, amazing! If you are considering and need more evidence, there are plenty:

The best diet for depression“, “Improving mood through diet” by Nutritionfacts.org

Foods that fight depression” by Physicians committee for responsible medicine

Knowing something works is one matter, but using it for real is another

Health practitioners usually have a heavy influence on what approaches patients take to improve their health. Doctors, dietitians, psychologists, therapists, coaches, and the plant-based community should take up the responsibility to be early adopters of lifestyle changes as disease intervention and treatment.

With this new study, health practitioners should be more confident in prescribing dietary interventions alongside other treatment options.

Of course, health is yours. No matter what the doctor, or the dietitian, or the internet says, you hold the ultimate choice of what to put in your body.

You may not be able to decide what kinds of food appear in an event you have to attend, but you can choose to avoid eating them and seek healthier alternatives.

When depression and anxiety kick in, you may feel like you don’t have control over your mind. But don’t just give up taking the control back and indulge in fast food for temporary pleasure.

Seek professional help, learn some nutrition from credible sources, and make small changes every day! Of course, exercise is another key element for improving your mood and overall health 🙂

healthy vegan

References

https://journals.lww.com/psychosomaticmedicine/Abstract/publishahead/The_effects_of_dietary_improvement_on_symptoms_of.98656.aspx

https://cspinet.org/eating-healthy/why-good-nutrition-important

https://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/health-and-wellness/the-simple-change-we-can-make-to-reduce-the-risk-of-depression-20190204-p50vmu.html

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? We have a bunch of support materials waiting for you including a dietitian guidebook, lifestyle checklists and assessments, and the best vegan websites we recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author
healthy vegan palette writer Rainie

Rainie is a health, fitness and nutrition enthusiastic. She studied a bachelor of Biomedical Sciences degree to learn all about the human body and continued to pursue higher research training in a neuroscience laboratory to investigate how the brain develops. Rainie is now using the research skills she learned in the science degree to bring evidence-based nutrition practice to more health-conscious people.

 


Vegan struggle – how to avoid unhealthy event food when the temptation is real

avoid unhealthy food at networking event

There must be some sort of healthy-ish plant-based food at the networking event…

Well even if there isn’t, I should be able to just refuse them…

Even if I just eat a few chips, I surely won’t stuff myself with oily snacks and voluntarily destroy my fitness goals…

. . .

Having these thoughts, I went to the career networking event for women in technology with full confidence, and here is my EPIC FAIL

. . .

The networking event was at a rooftop bar – nice vibes, loud music, everyone was already holding a glass of alcoholic drink when I got there.

I looked around the room, there was not a single person who wasn’t holding a glass, oh well I guess I’d be the first one as I really am not a fan of alcohol.

I started talking to people and Canapé started coming out one after another, populating the tables and making the whole place smell a m a z i n g.

catering food

A huge sushi platter came out first, without any dietary labels, it seemed to be a mix of meat, fish and potentially vego ones?

Busy in conversations, I couldn’t get the chance to talk to the staff to figure out whether anything was vegan, so I kept talking, but my eyes kept drifting to the food, judging whether they might be vegan or not.

Then a plate of deep-fried snacks came out: spring rolls, curry puffs and some Asian dim sims, accompanied with sweet chilli sauce and sour cream. I knew I shouldn’t eat any of those but as soon as someone said it is a vego/vegan platter, my eyes lit up.

spring rolls

I reached out for a spring roll, dipped in the sweet chili sauce, only a little bit, holding onto my last bit of rational thought that this deep-fried thing with processed sugar sauce wouldn’t make my body happy afterward (I’m very sensitive to bad food).

It tasted so good that I couldn’t help but reach out to the curry puff beside it, this time dipping a large chunk of it into the sugar sauce.

My rational brain is ringing the alarms but my primitive reward center is being overwhelmed by flavor and the impulse to just eat more.

O.M.G.

Look at those sweet potato chips, they look so tempting. Surely they are at least healthier than the normal chips because look at them, they are the SPECIAL SWEET POTATOES!

chips

I immediately took one. Wow, it didn’t feel too oily! Next thing I knew, I was taking one after another, non-stop.

“Rainie, stop.” – my rational brain

“It’s made from plants, though.”

“But it’s deep-fried and look at that salt!”

“But it’s the best thing I can find here…”

My mouth is talking (and eating), my brain is also talking. I felt unstoppable, totally out of control.

cant stop eating

O.M.G.

Just when I thought things couldn’t get any worse, a whole plate of chicken wings and beef pies came out at the same time.

fried chicken

The people around me were excited, clearly wasn’t expecting so much yummy food at a free event.

I obviously was not going to eat any of that, but felt I had to eat something else instead…So I reached for more chips, spring rolls and curry puffs…

Finally, I couldn’t do it anymore. I’ve stuffed myself with a bunch of deep-fried finger foods, half bowl of the chips – what an epic fail.

I said to the people around me I had to use the bathroom and left the event. I didn’t know what’s going to happen had I stayed longer.

. . .

You can probably imagine the story from here, I was so disappointed with myself – the total lack of self-control. I thought…I thought I’d be able to behave better! I thought my taste buds and brain have changed to not be tempted by those foods!

sad

That curry puff tasted a bit like meat, was it even vegan?? Why did I feel embarrassed to ask?

Oh..my stomach is really not happy now.

I spent 2 hours feeling terrible, physically and mentally.

So I went on to a Facebook group “How not to die – Dr Greger 2.0” and asked for advice.

I am so glad I did. The responses I got were so supportive and educational – I realized so many people have gone through the same struggle, and we could do better!

be positive in life

7 tips on going to events and not end up like me

1. Eat something beforehand, never expect food at these events to be as healthy as what you can make at home.

2. Take some snacks with you – apples, nuts, homemade cookies etc.

3. Give the venue a call and ask for the menu before the event to be prepared.

4. (This one is my favorite) “You can always pull it out and ignore the sometimes rude looks or comments and know my health is more important than worrying about how I look not participating in the SAD (Standard America Diet) “.

5. Be mindful – try and think about the feeling you will get after eating that way. It never feels good right? Remember that guilt feeling.

6. (I also realized this one is so important)Be ok with the idea that occasionally you’ll be less than perfect – like Dr gregor who says some days he doesn’t get anywhere near his own dozen and there are situations where it’s just really hard to put together a healthy meal. Diet health is more about the long term not the odd snack or meal”.

7. You can always do better next time. It is a journey. Do the best you can in any situation. Don’t beat yourself up. Next day you can go back to whole plant-based foods.

. . .

I got up the next morning and read all 22 comments, feeling empowered again. Yes, I did worse than I wanted to. But I learned a valuable lesson and am stronger than ever. I made myself a healthy, beautiful oatmeal bowl and I feel great again.

healthy vegan oatmeal

Being healthy and plant-based is a life-long goal, it may not be possible to be perfect every day, but it should make you feel happy, healthy and fulfilled most days. If your will is not strong enough today, just learn from it and be a better version of yourself tomorrow. Reflect on your progress often, share your struggles with the community, and never burn out on your own.

I learned a great deal from this experience, and hope you can too (without going through the chips and spring rolls yourself haha…)

If you have any experience or advice to share, Vegan Palette is more than happy to be your platform!

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

The best tool every vegan should use to talk about veganism

iron veganism cartoon

How to respond to the ignorant and hurtful comments on your “non-filling”, “deficient”, “flavour-less” vegan meals is probably one of the most annoying things that every vegan has to prepare for at some point.

 

Have you ever wondered why it is still so hard for vegans to eat in peace, despite all the documentaries, research, slaughterhouse videos, celebrities, news articles all talking about veganism loud and clear?

 

It is still generally considered that vegans have to give up many enjoyable things in life to love animals, locked away from all the yummy foods. Why?

 

Miki Mottes, a vegan illustrator who made Simple Happy Kitchen, raised a good point. Maybe all the public is seeing is the disturbing despite truthful images of slaughterhouses, but not so much of the enjoyable, and nutritious food we have.

 

If you think about it: how did the meat, tobacco or milk industry lure us into buying their products? – Relaxing, sweet and fun campaigns. The milk ads often involve adorable babies, the cigarettes ads often elicit a relaxing feeling and the meat campaigns do it the best – they zoom right into the splashing juice when grilling a steak. Aren’t these just irresistible?

 

If there is a more gentle, fun, and easy way to tell your friends, or the haters, about veganism, how will you feel?

 

I would be so relieved. I don’t have to waste my time showing the truth for the 1000th time to that colleague who just never wants to take my words! I don’t have to go find some corner and eat my lunch alone just to avoid communication on this topic!

 

Miki understood that for more people to understand our lifestyle, and that we don’t suffer from just eating plant foods, we have to show them veganism is fun, simple, and nutritious.

 

SO..She turned

…into

She turned this boring bar graph

into…

Her illustrations are simple, uplifting, evidence-based, and easy for anyone (even the stonehearted) to take in, bits by bit.

 

And guess what? If you are struggling to explain vegan nutrition to a friend, your little one, or simply anyone, Miki has cool illustrations like this one:

 

Now. Do you think people will feel we are suffering from this vegan diet? Do you think people will say we are just imposing our beliefs onto them?

 

For the health of humans, animals and the planet, we need to keep doing the good work we are doing telling the truth, living the life, but also showing how enjoyable this lifestyle can be!

 

We need to be intelligent at the approach we use to spread the love, and Miki has offered us great tools!

 

You can freely download Miki’s Protein, Calcium and Iron printable posters here, even in different languages!

 

We should thank all the vegans out there for doing the great work protecting the animals, the planet and human health. If you would like to support Miki’s gentle approach, check out her book How to go vegan – the simple happy kitchen.

 

I hope you all find this tool helpful, and keep spreading the love!

 

*All images in this blog belong to Miki Mottes and can be found on her website – Simple Happy Kitchen

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

Combating diabetes: latest research and approaches

 

What is the most important factor when it comes to diabetes genetics, sugar, calories, insulin? 

 

A few years ago, we may say sugar and insulin, but new research has dramatically changed what we know about diabetes.

 

“Fat, get out of the way and let me pump my sugar!” – Insulin.

 

It turns out that the fat in animal products and oils prevent insulin from doing its critical job – moving glucose into cells, lowering blood sugar level, and keeping us healthy.

 

In other words, what caused your diabetes or made it worse is not just your refined white bread or sugary drinks, but also the mayo dressing or cheese slices that you eat all the time!

 

Experiments on mice have shown that when fat is reduced from the diet, insulin can function properly, alleviating and eventually curing Type II diabetes!

 

Therefore, a low-fat, plant-based diet is the best for diabetes and conditions associated with it, such as heart disease, obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

Has this been shown in humans?

 

Yes. One study found that 21 of 23 patients on oral medications and 13 of 17 patients on insulin did not need their medications after 26 days on a near-vegetarian diet and exercise program.

These dietary changes are simple, but the effects they had are profound, both on a short-term and long-term scale. However, Dr. Neal Barnard from Physicians Committee of Responsible medicine points out that “choosing skinless chicken, skim milk, and baked fish is not enough of a change for most people to beat diabetes”. A plant-based diet is necessary if you are serious about diabetes.

How to combat diabetes with a dietary approach?

Go plant-based and throw out animal products.

Make your meals with whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Drink water. Keep nuts
or seeds to a small handful every day. The amount that you sprinkle on your breakfast oatmeal is sufficient. Avoid animal products of all sorts to avoid saturated fats. You can easily get your protein and fat intake with balanced plant-based meals so don’t worry. Plus, there are plenty of resources on our page that can help you, such as this food plate from Vegan Palette.
vegan Food Plate

Avoid vegetable oil too.

Although vegetable oils are healthier compared to animal fats, they should still be avoided. All fats and oils are high in calories – 1g of any fat or oil has 9 calories, whereas 1g of carbohydrate has only 4 calories. We only need a small amount each day and it is so easy to go overboard in the modern days. Remember to watch out for oily sauces and dressings. Also, don’t assume you can eat as many avocados and nuts as you want! Check out this video by an accredited dietitian, nutritionist Raymond from Vegan Palette :”Why eating plant-based means giving up oil“.

Read food labels! 

Don’t be fooled by the packaging. Food industries can print “Low-calories”, “Low fat” in big block letters and fool you into thinking they are healthy. Always check the back and choose foods with no more than 2-3g of fat per serving if you are serious about not getting diabetes.

Avoid high GI foods.

The glycemic index (GI) identifies foods that tend to raise blood sugar. These include white rice, white and wheat bread, corn flakes, puffed rice cereals, and most commercial cereals. Swap them with low GI foods, such as oats, sweet potations, natural pasta, beans and so on. Instead of rice, you can eat quinoa. Instead of white bread, you can eat rye bread, multigrain brain, and sourdough.

Lots and lots of fibre. 

Fibre is literally the best thing about plant-based diets. They are the natural cleaners for your blood vessels and digestive system. If you follow the above advice and eat plenty of plant foods, you will easily get at least 40g of fibre per day. You should aim for at least 40g of fibre each day. When reading food labels, check if there is at least 3g of fiber per serving.

To learn more about diabetes and get started fixing it with a plant-based dietary approach, we recommend these resources:

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

Is bread healthy? How to select wisely with these simple tricks

bread

I love bread. Who doesn’t like watching bread take its shape in the oven, while smelling that appetising hot air? Finally, that long awaited bread is ready, you take it out of the oven, and sprinkle some cinnamon – perfect.

 

We are not alone. Bread has been consumed for over 30,000 years. It is THE MOST popular food in the whole wide world.

 

It makes sense that bread arose early in the human history as an excellent source of nutrition since a traditional loaf requires only 4 ingredients: flour, yeast, water and salt. For natural leavens or sourdoughs, yeast is even unnecessary.

 

The bread we are eating today

 

“What? Just 4 ingredients? What is that long list of ingredients at the back of the bread I buy then?”

white bread ingredients

Source: Cole’s Whole-Grain Cinnamon French Toast

 

Take the white bread as an example. You would think that the ingredient list should look simple, but unfortunately it is not.

 

Nowadays, bread is not just bread anymore. The simplest white bread has over 30 ingredients, many of them an ordinary person can’t even pronounce. In fact, white bread isn’t even nutritionally worth it to consume, as it is so deprived of nutrients and fibre during the heaving processing. I recommend you watch Dr. Michael Greger‘s video on Is white bread good for you?

 

If bread only takes 4 ingredients to make, what are all these things doing there? Probably to make the bread appear ultra white, smooth, light, soft and even stay on the shelf for weeks. I don’t think we want those things in our bodies.

 

Well, white bread is bad because it is so cheap. But what about the more expensive ones that claim to be healthier?

abbotts bread ingredients

 

The Abbott’s bread is a popular “healthy choice” in Australia. Now the ingredient list looks more like comprehensible language, indeed much better. But still, what are maltodextrin, emulsifiers and flavouring powders doing there?

 

It is extremely hard to find simple, authentic bread made of just the ingredients necessary. This is just an example of over-processing in the modern food industry.

 

Should we just stop eating bread? That’s not what i am suggesting. Baked bread is an excellent source of iodine, and whole-grain bread with little processing is excellent. Research has shown that 3 portions of whole gains can reduce the risk of getting a heart attack by 15%, and the risk of getting a stroke by roughly 25%.

 

It just takes some effort to find bread that is actually good for you. But we are going to teach you how!

 

What bread should you really be eating?

If the original recipe for bread is simply 4 ingredients, then it makes sense that we should aim to get bread that is made that way. In other words – get as close to the original recipe as possible.

 

Instead of going to supermarket, try a local bakery and ask the baker what the ingredients are. The bakers tend to use real flour, instead of the “enriched” or “refined” flour that is commonly used in commercial bread.

 

Note that for people who are trying to control their blood sugar levels, definitely stay away from enriched or refined white flour, as they can make your blood sugar to spike.

 

In contrast, natural whole grains are nutrient-dense, more satiating and is much milder on blood sugar level. Be careful though, that many commercial bread put words like “multi-grain“, “whole-grain” at the front of their packaging but are actually misleading. Flip over the bread and look at the ingredient list to see if those are false claims.

 

A simple math trick to distinguish between true whole-grain bread and false claims

One way you can quickly distinguish between authentic whole-grain bread and false claims is this simple math trick: if the serving size ratio of carbohydrates to fibre is equal to or less than 5 to 1 (eg. 15g of carbs and 3g of fibre), this bread passes the whole-grain test. If the ratio ends up being something like 18, which is not uncommon for many brands, put the bread back onto the shelf.

 

This simple 5 to 1 rule comes from Dr. Michael Gregor and can be used for other things too such as breakfast cereal. Don’t ever believe what the front package claims without performing this test yourself!

 

Sourdough breads 

 

Another healthy option, especially for people who are gluten-sensitive is sourdough. This is the bread that Ikarians eat. Ikaria is one of the world’s blue zones (places with the highest life expectancy). Ikaria has even been called the island where people forget to die! One secret is that ikarians eat true sourdough bread that is fermented not with bakers yeast but lactobacilli, a beneficial naturally-occurring bacterial strain. The resulting bread is slightly more sour in taste, but has less gluten and a naturally longer shelf life. It is nutrient-rich and slow burning, excellent for those who want to lost fat.

 

However, it is common to find fake sourdough breads in stores nowadays. If they still contain yeast or sweetener, they are not true sourdough breads. Go to a local bakery and ask for how their sourdough bread is made. Of course, the best solution is to just make you own. Here is a recipe from the Blue Zones website.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, this post is not to discourage you from eating bread. Good whole-grain bread is beneficial for you but you need to select wisely. Choose bread with fewer ingredients, ideally baked fresh in a local bakery. Always have a chat with the baker to see how the bread is made, especially when you are looking for true sourdough breads – they can be tricky to find. Use the simple “5 to 1 carbs to fibre” rule to distinguish between true whole-grain bread and false claims. If you can implement these simple tricks to select your bread, you can enjoy the pleasures of bread as well as the health benefits!

 

References

https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/050113p44.shtml

https://nutritionfacts.org/2018/05/08/follow-the-5-to-1-rule-for-packaged-foods/

https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-white-bread-good-for-you/

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

 

 

 

Why can’t food scientists agree on coconut oil? Does it really burn fat?

What’s the fuss?

Coconut oil is probably one of the most controversial food. Some regard it is a “superfood“, rich in antioxidant and other nutrients. Claims regarding what it can do ranges from burning fat, preventing Alzheimer’s disease and improving endurance. But surprisingly, others consider it as a “devilfood“. Karin Micheals, a professor at Harvard, even went as far as calling coconut oil a “pure poison“.

 

What’s the truth?

Why can’t food scientists agree on coconut oil? Are the claimed benefits backed up by research or made up simply for propaganda?

 

Well, interestingly this debate on the coconut oil is actually related to changes in our nutrition guidelines and beliefs.

 

In the past, fats were considered bad and people consumed mostly carbohydrates in their diets. Of course, in the modern days, carbs often translate into highly processed, bad carbs, not complex natural carbs. As a result, obesity and diabetes skyrocketed, leading to new advice in the opposite direction “Avoid carbs and eat more fats!”

 

The pro-fat voice soon pushed avocados, olive oil and chia seeds into the spotlight. The public quickly learned about these new foods and called them “superfood“. While most food scientists and nutritionists agree that the fats in avocados and olive oil are healthy, compared to other fat sources, they couldn’t quite agree on coconut oil, a food composed almost entirely of saturated fat!

 

For decades, the heart associations educate people that saturated fat is bad as it increases cholesterol levels, putting people at risk for terrible heart diseases.

 

But coconut oil comes from plants, surely it is healthy?

 

Of course, coconut oil is not pro-inflammatory like meat. But compared to other vegetable oil that is lower in saturated fat, coconut oil does increase LDL cholesterol (the “bad” cholesterol” levels, make it less healthy. Therefore, it is all relative – coconut oil can be considered healthy or unhealthy, depending on what you are comparing it to.

 

If you have been puzzled by coconut oil, don’t subscribe to either extreme – It is not a “superfood“, but it is also not a “devilfood“. There are both better and worse sources that can offer you the needed fat.

 

Does coconut oil really burn fat?

The fat-burning claim about coconut oil came from some evidence that suggested the medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) in coconut oil can promote fat loss. While it is true that coconut oil contains a lot of MCT, follow-up research has shown no difference in the fat-burning ability of coconut oil compared to other types of oil.

 

In fact, there are only 4 calories in 1 gram of protein and carbohydrate, but there are 9 calories in 1 gram of fat! Correct – more than double. This applies to all oil types, including coconut oil! So by consuming lots of coconut oil, you can easily add 200-400 extra calories and that of course, will reflect on your waistline. To sum up, coconut oil doesn’t burn fat, instead, it could make you gain weight. You should avoid over-consumption of all types of oils, even if it’s vegetable oil!

 

Conclusion

For those of you already on a vegan, plant-based diet, coconut oil is probably in your kitchen a lot. Don’t throw it out, as it is surely much better than butter and improves the flavor of many dishes. However, also don’t over-use this one type of oil. In fact, be cautious of any claim of “superfood” as it is like just propaganda. The best way to eat healthily is always to have variety like we always advocate for at Vegan Palette. In this case of oil, have other monounsaturated and polyunsaturated oils in your kitchens, such as olive oil, sunflower oil, and canola oil.

 

To learn more about coconut oil and vegetable oils, I recommend Dr. Michael Greger:

Coconut oil

Is coconut oil good for you?

Does coconut oil cure Alzheimer’s?

Does coconut oil clog arteries?

What about coconuts, coconut milk & coconut oil MCTs?

 

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26946252

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326600

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.

 

 

Who are at risk for iodine deficiency and how to prevent it on a vegan diet

vegan food

While it is common for vegans to worry about B12, Iodine doesn’t get nearly as much attention. You’ll soon get to learn about some surprising facts about iodine from this post and know what to do to avoid iodine deficiency.

 

Iodine is crucial for the production of thyroid hormones. Deficiency can lead to thyroid enlargement. Pregnant women, in particular, need to pay close attention as inadequate iodine can harm the growth of the developing foetus.

 

Since vegans replace cow’s milk with various plant milk, one concern is that the lower iodine content in plant milk puts vegans at higher risk of iodine deficiency. Is this true that veganism is the reason for iodine deficiency and non-vegans are safe from it?

 

First of all, even the non-vegans are not getting as much iodine out of milk since the dairy industry has stopped using iodine-based disinfectant for cleaning milking equipment. So definitely don’t subscribe to the claim that drinking cow’s milk keeps you safe from iodine deficiencies. In fact, Australians on average have median iodine intake (only about 100mcg!), which makes us mildly iodine deficient. Everyone needs to be more aware of their iodine intake!

 

Here are the iodine intake recommendations:

  • 150mcg   Adults
  • 220mcg  Pregnant women
  • 270mcg  Breast feeding women
  • 90mcg    Children aged 1-8 years old
  • 1000mcg recommended upper limit of intake (too much is toxic too!)

 

Let’s take a look at what other factors can affect iodine levels in people.

 

1. Regional soil

Due to lower soil iodine levels in the South East Australia, children have lower iodine levels when compared to those from Queensland and Western Australia.

 

2. Processed food industry

Iodised salt is an excellent source for iodine, except it is not used as much as the old days. Instead, it is often replaced by all sorts of other processed food flavors, chemicals, that achieve the same or better taste, without the added iodine.

 

3. People avoiding bread on low-carb diets

Believe it or not, the iodine deficiency problem is addressed by legislation that requires bakers to use iodised salt in bread. Therefore, having whole-grain bread is recommended. Nowadays, carb is still falsely perceived as “The devil for weight” in many people’s minds. While it is true that white bread is unhealthy as it is highly refined and poor in nutrition, whole-grain bread is excellent for your nutrition.

 

So how can we ensure adequate iodine intake?

A true whole food, plant-based diet.

By that, I don’t mean processed vegan junk food, grain-free, low-carb diet, but a truly balanced diet that focuses on a variety of whole foods, minimally processed and covering all the essential food groups. For more information on what these food groups are, visit my comprehensive Resources page after this post.

 

Dietitian recommendations on how to avoid iodine deficiency

  • While too much salt is certainly bad for you, do use iodised salt and bake bread with iodised salt on a diet that is low in salt. Completely eliminating salt from your diet is not recommended.
  • Seaweed products are a rich source of iodine.  I recommend Nori (40mcg per 2.5g sheet), wakame (250mcg/g) and dulse (~125mcg/g).

Nori to avoid iodine deficiencywakame to avoid iodine deficiencydulse to avoid iodine deficiency

 

  • For some, getting iodine from diet is simply not enough, be it vegan or other diets. Women who are breastfeeding, pregnant or planning to become pregnant should be extra conscious of iodine. First, have the iodine status checked with a doctor. Or, take a small iodine supplement providing 75-150mgs of iodine everyday.

 

Conclusion

It is certainly untrue that vegans are the only people at risk for iodine deficiency. In fact, the average Australian is mildly deficient! Therefore, drinking cow’s milk is not a safeguard to high iodine level. It is just another false claim from the dairy industry, unfortunately. Keep plant powered folks, and sprinkle a little iodised salt on your amazing plant foods!

 

For more information, I highly recommend Dr. Michael Greger’s videos

 

Feel free to let us know your personal journey on this, our Brisbane-based accredited practicing dietitian, nutritionist is here to help! You can learn about our services and how to get in touch.

 

References

Plant based Health Australia

National Health and Medical Research Council

Nutrition Australia

 

You’ll love these

Have you checked out our comprehensive Vegan Health & Nutrition Resources page? I’ve compiled my gifts, knowledge and tips regarding thriving on a vegan lifestyle in this page, including a dietitian guidebook, grocery shopping list, lifestyle checklists, and the best vegan websites I recommend, all for you for FREE.

 

About the author


Raymond_dietitian_from_Vegan_Palette_with_food_plate

Raymond Setiadi is an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian and is the founder of Vegan Palette,  a Brisbane-based dietitian practice.

As an expert in whole food plant-based nutrition and fat loss strategies, Raymond has a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between food,  human physiology, goal-directed psychology, and how they all play a pivotal role in one’s pursuit of optimal health.